Is Snowmobile Insurance Required? State by State Requirements


One of the questions that easily come to snowmobilers’ minds is about the insurance requirements for their state. We have decided to answer this question for all the residents of the US. Kindly go through this article to see what your state requires before you start riding your snowmobile.

Requirements of Each State in the U.S.

If you live in the US, then you will certainly find what your states require as you read this article. We didn’t only mention the insurance requirements in this article, but we’ve also mentioned other requirements such as registration and titling.

Alabama

Alabama is among the US state where snowmobile insurance is available, but the state doesn’t mandate insurance for snowmobilers. Also, a certificate of title is not required for snowmobiles. Snowmobilers who want insurance protection for themselves can easily obtain liability coverage as well as other kinds of coverages.

https://www.alabama.gov

Alaska

The state doesn’t require snowmobile insurance, but snowmobilers must have a trail permit before they can ride in Alaska. While insurance isn’t mandatory, snowmobilers who wish to avoid financial problems can obtain insurance at a low cost.

On average, liability insurance in Alaska can be as low as $80 per year. Additional insurance coverage like the comprehensive coverage, collision coverage, accessory coverage, and other kinds of coverages require a payment between  $300 to $400 per year.

https://www.alaska.gov

Arizona

Arizona does not require a snowmobile insurance, but snowmobilers must have a trail permit before they can ride on public lands or state-designated trails. If you reside in Arizona, you can easily obtain a trail permit from the Arizona Department of Transportation Motor Vehicle Division. It’s up to you to decide whether you need to obtain insurance.

https://az.gov/government-0

Arkansas

Snowmobile insurance is not required in Arkansas, but snowmobile registration is mandatory.

https://portal.arkansas.gov

California

Snowmobile insurance isn’t compulsory, but snowmobile registration is compulsory. If you bring in a snowmobile from a state that doesn’t require registration, you must obtain a non-resident over snow vehicle permit.

In essence, you won’t be fined for riding a snowmobile without insurance but you will be fined if you ride an unregistered snowmobile. You may decide to obtain insurance If you wish to protect yourself from financial problems that can result from an accident.

https://www.ca.gov

Colorado

Insurance is not required, but registration is required. If you register your snowmobile in Colorado, you will obtain a registration number which you must display on your snowmobile at all times. The registration number is all you need to operate your snowmobile in all authorized areas.

However, you can choose to insure your snowmobile in order to avoid financial issues that can arise from accidents. Both insurance and registration will not be necessary if you operate your snowmobile on your personal property strictly for private purposes.

https://www.colorado.gov

Connecticut

You can ride a snowmobile in Connecticut even if you don’t have insurance coverage. Law enforcement officers can’t fine you if your snowmobile isn’t insured, but they can fine you if it’s unregistered. In Connecticut, you must carry your snowmobile registration with you always and tender it to law enforcement officers if they demand for it.

Also, you must affix your registration plate to the rear of the snowmobile. The registration fee and plate fee are  $30 and $5 respectively. You don’t need to carry evidence of insurance or any other document aside from your evidence of registration. However, you can insure your snowmobile for personal purposes.

https://portal.ct.gov

Delaware

Both insurance and registration are not required for snowmobiles in Delaware. You can ride your snowmobile on public trails without insurance or registration document. You are free to insure your snowmobile for personal reasons.

https://delaware.gov

Florida

The state will only require you to register your snowmobile and display your registration number on both sides of your snowmobile. It’s up to you to decide whether you need insurance.

https://www.myflorida.com

Georgia

Insurance coverage and registration are not required in Georgia. Snowmobilers who wish to insure their snowmobile can do so at any insurance company within the state.

https://georgia.gov

Hawaii

Insurance coverage is not required or available in Hawaii. Snowmobiles are not common in Hawaii, which is why you won’t find any insurance company to insure your snowmobile in Hawaii.

https://portal.ehawaii.gov

Idaho

Insurance coverage is not compulsory in Idaho but registration and trail permits are compulsory. Snowmobile owners in Idaho must register their snowmobile every year and affix their registration stickers to the two sides of their snowmobile. The registration fee is $32.50. Snowmobilers don’t need to carry proof of insurance or any other document aside from their proof of registration and trail permit.

https://www.idaho.gov

Illinois

Liability insurance coverage is mandatory in Illinois if you operate your snowmobile outside your personal property. However, you don’t need a liability insurance to operate your snowmobile on another person’s property if the owner of the property permits you to operate your snowmobile there. When you need to ride on public trails, you must carry your proof of liability insurance along with you.

You must provide your proof of liability insurance coverage policy if a law enforcement officer or any person claims to have suffered either property damage or personal injury due to the operation of your snowmobile. Insurance coverage in Illinois can be as low as  $100 per year.

Aside from insurance coverage, you also need to obtain a state trail permit and register your snowmobile before you can ride on public trails. The registration fee is $45. Once you have insured your snowmobile, registered it, and have a state trail permit, you can ride on all authorized public areas and trails.

https://www2.illinois.gov

Indiana

Insurance coverage is not compulsory, but you can still insure your snowmobile for personal reasons. Even if your snowmobile is insured, you must not ride it on another person’s property without seeking permission from the landowner. Also, you must register your snowmobile with a fee of $30 before you can ride it on public property.

https://www.in.gov/core/

Iowa

Insurance coverage is not mandatory in Iowa but all snowmobilers must have IDNR snowmobile user permit and evidence of snowmobile registration when they are riding on any public property. There are several insurance companies where you can insure your snowmobile if you’re willing.

https://www.iowa.gov

Kansas

Both insurance coverage and snowmobile registration are not required in Kansas. However, you must obtain a certificate of title before you can ride your snowmobile on public trails. You are free to insure your snowmobile in order to save yourself from financial embarrassment that can result from snowmobile accidents.

https://portal.kansas.gov/

Kentucky

Insurance is optional in Kentucky, but snowmobile registration and titling are compulsory. Kindly note that insurance coverage doesn’t give you the right to operate your snowmobile on another person’s property without seeking permission from the landowner.

https://kentucky.gov/Pages/home.aspx

Louisiana

Insurance is not required in Louisiana. However, you can insure your snowmobile if you hate taking unnecessary financial risks.

https://www.louisiana.gov

Maine

The snowmobile law in Maine is flexible enough to allow snowmobilers to ride on public properties without having any insurance coverage. Snowmobile licensing is also not required. The only requirement from the state is snowmobile registration. While insurance isn’t compulsory, you may still insure your snowmobile to protect yourself against losses. Snowmobile liability insurance in Maine can be as low as $80 per year.

https://www.maine.gov/portal/index.html

Maryland

You can insure your snowmobile in Maryland, but the state doesn’t require it. The things that the state requires are snowmobile title, registration, and ORV permit. The fee for title and ORV permit are $100 and $5 respectively. Insurance coverage price varies widely across insurance companies.

https://www.maryland.gov/Pages/default.aspx

Massachusetts

You don’t need insurance coverage to ride a snowmobile in Massachusetts, but you must register your snowmobile and obtain a trail pass. Even if you insure your snowmobile, you mustn’t ride it on another person’s property without obtaining written permission from the landowner.

https://www.mass.gov

Michigan

The state does not require insurance coverage, but it’s better to protect yourself financially by insuring your snowmobile. What the state requires from snowmobilers are trail permit, ORV license, and snowmobile registration.

Minnesota

The state doesn’t require insurance, but it ensures the safety of snowmobilers by making snowmobile safety course compulsory for all snowmobilers who are at least 11 years old. Everyone who completes the safety course will receive a certificate for it. Snowmobilers must carry their certificate whenever they are riding outside their private property.

Also, snowmobilers must register for trail use for $113.5, which is the registration fee for 3 years. You must not ride on state trails if you fail to register or if your registration has expired. You are free to insure your snowmobile for personal purposes.

https://mn.gov/portal/

Mississippi

The state doesn’t require insurance coverage. Notwithstanding, you can insure your snowmobile to avoid financial problems that can arise from snowmobile accident.

https://www.ms.gov/home

Missouri

It’s not compulsory to insure snowmobiles in Missouri, but it’s compulsory to register your snowmobile. If law enforcement officers catch you riding an unregistered snowmobile, they can fine you or even tow your snowmobile. While insurance coverage can save you from losses that arise from accident, it won’t save you from losses that arise from law breaking attitudes.

https://www.mo.gov

Montana

The Montana state government won’t compel you to insure your snowmobile, but it’s better to insure it. Whether you have insurance coverage or not, you must have a valid driver’s license before you can ride your snowmobile in Montana. Alternatively, you can obtain a safety certificate by completing the Montana-Approved Snowmobile Safety Course.

https://mt.gov

Nebraska

The state doesn’t require you to insure your snowmobile, but snowmobile registration is mandatory. Upon registration, you will receive a decal which you must affix to your vehicle. The fee for registration and decal is $16 and it is valid for 2 years. You may not register your snowmobile if you don’t operate it outside your private property.

https://www.nebraska.gov

Nevada

In Nevada, you don’t need insurance coverage and a trail permit to ride on public property. Registration is the only thing that the state requires. The registration fee is $21 per year. Although insurance isn’t compulsory, you can insure your snowmobile to avoid losses that can result from accident.

New Hampshire

The state doesn’t require insurance coverage, but it requires snowmobile registration. The registration gives you the privilege to operate your snowmobile on state trails. Even though insurance coverage isn’t compulsory, it’s better to have it because the authority will require you to pay for injuries or damages that you cause in the course of riding.

https://www.nh.gov/index.htm

New Jersey

You don’t need insurance coverage and license to operate your snowmobile in New Jersey. The state only requires you to register your snowmobile. Once your snowmobile is registered, you are free to ride it on public trails without having any form of insurance coverage. However, you should note that insurance coverage could save you from losses.

https://nj.gov

New Mexico

In New Mexico, insurance coverage isn’t required to ride on public trails. However, anyone who is younger than 18 years must take a New Mexico-Approved Snowmobile Safety Course to reduce the rate of accidents. Any snowmobiler who wishes to protect himself or herself against losses is free to get insurance coverage.

https://www.newmexico.gov

New York

All snowmobilers in New York must have snowmobile insurance coverage. The minimum insurance coverage that the state expects is a liability coverage of 10/20/5. That is the insurance must be able to cover up to $10,000 in bodily injury per person, a sum of $20,000 in bodily injury for an accident that injures more than a person, and $5,000 if personal property gets damaged.

Aside from the insurance coverage requirement, the state also expects snowmobilers who are under the age of 18 years to complete a New York State Approved Snowmobile Safety Course.

https://www.ny.gov

North Carolina

In North Carolina, snowmobile insurance coverage and registration are not compulsory. Notwithstanding, those who don’t like taking financial risks can insure their snowmobiles.

https://www.nc.gov

North Dakota

Snowmobilers must have liability insurance before they can ride a snowmobile on snowmobile trails that the state government owns. If a law enforcement officer demands for proof of liability insurance, the snowmobile operator must provide the proof within 20 days.

Also, you need to register your snowmobile with the North Dakota Department of Transportation before you can ride on public trails. The registration fee is $50.

https://www.nd.gov

Ohio

Snowmobilers in Ohio can ride on public trails without carrying any proof of insurance. However, snowmobilers must carry their driver’s license and tender it to any enforcement officer that demands it. The driver’s license that car owners use is also the driver’s license that snowmobilers need.

https://ohio.gov

Oklahoma

Anyone who is above the age of 18 years can ride a snowmobile in Oklahoma without having insurance coverage. A one-time snowmobile registration is all that the state requires from all owners of snowmobile.

https://www.ok.gov

Oregon

Insurance isn’t required, but it’s recommend. Snowmobilers will be held responsible for any damage they cause, so it’s better to have insurance coverage to save yourself from financial issues. Before you can ride a snowmobile on public trails you need to register your snowmobile and title it. The registration fee and title fee are $10 and $7 respectively.

https://www.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx

Pennsylvania

Snowmobile insurance is compulsory for snowmobiles that are duly registered in Pennsylvania. The type of snowmobile registration is the major factor that determines insurance requirements. The state recognizes only the insurance issued by authorized insurance carriers.

You don’t necessarily need to insure your snowmobile if you own a vintage snowmobile or if your registration is limited. Owners of insured snowmobiles must carry their proof of insurance each time they are operating their vehicle.

If enforcement officers catch anyone riding a registered snowmobile without carrying proof of insurance, they can fine the snowmobiler up to $300. Also, you mustn’t ride an unregistered or untitled snowmobile even if you have insurance coverage.

https://www.pa.gov

Rhode Island

The state only recommends insurance coverage. Snowmobilers are free to decide whether they need to insure their snowmobile. Snowmobile registration is the only mandatory requirement from the state. After you register, you will receive an identification certificate, which you must carry with you every time you are operating your snowmobile.

https://www.ri.gov

South Carolina

South Carolina does not require insurance coverage, registration, and title for snowmobiles. While the laws that bind the use of snowmobiles are quite flexible here, snowmobilers still need to be careful about how they ride. If you want some levels of financial protection, then you should insure your snowmobile.

https://sc.gov

South Dakota

In South Dakota, snowmobilers must have liability insurance before they can ride on public trails. Also, residents are required to pay a $20 fee for a license that lasts for two years.

Nonresidents must also pay $40 for a permit that lasts for 5 days. If a law enforcement officer catches anyone operating a snowmobile without a liability insurance, license, or permit, they will fine the individual a huge amount.

https://sd.gov

Tennessee

Snowmobilers don’t need insurance coverage, registration, and titling to ride snowmobiles in Tennessee. No law enforcement agent will issue tickets for you if your snowmobile isn’t insured, but you can insure it for your own benefits.

https://www.tn.gov

Texas

Insurance coverage isn’t compulsory in Texas. Those who wish to insure their snowmobiles will find a few snowmobile insurance companies to walk up to. Insurance companies for snowmobiles aren’t much in Texas since the number of snowmobiles is not as high as the ones in other US states.

https://www.texas.gov

Utah

Insurance coverage is not compulsory in Utah, but registration is compulsory. The registration fee is $30 per year for non-residents or $22 per year for Utahns. Anyone who wishes to get insurance coverage is free to do so.

Vermont

All snowmobilers who ride on the state’s trail system must have at least liability insurance coverage or its equivalent protection in bonds. The least insurance coverage must table to cover $25,000 per person with injury, a total of $50,000 for an accident that injures more than a person, and $10,000 as liability protection for damaged property.

Even if snowmobilers ride a short distance on state trails while moving towards private trails, they must still carry proof of insurance. Failure to do so will lead to the payment of fines. Also, registration is compulsory in Vermont.

https://www.vermont.gov

Virginia

You don’t necessarily have to insure, register, or license your snowmobile before you ride it on public trails. Whatever form of insurance coverage you have is only for your benefit.

https://www.virginia.gov

Washington

The state doesn’t require insurance coverage, but it’s best to have it. While insurance isn’t mandatory, registration is mandatory for all snowmobile owners. Whether you ride your snowmobile on private property or public property, you must have proof of registration.

https://access.wa.gov

West Virginia

In West Virginia, it’s not compulsory for you to have insurance coverage. However, snowmobile title is compulsory. You are free to insure your snowmobile if you feel it’s necessary. Insurance coverage in West Virginia can be as low as $100 per year.

https://www.wv.gov/Pages/default.aspx

Wisconsin

Insurance is not compulsory in Wisconsin, but registration is compulsory. Also, all snowmobilers who are at least 12 years old must take a Wisconsin-Approved Snowmobile Safety Course. Those who wish to get an additional level of financial security should insure their snowmobiles.

https://www.wisconsin.gov/Pages/Home.aspx

Wyoming

The state doesn’t mandate insurance, but it’s good to have it. What the state requires is registration. The registration fee is $25.

http://www.wyo.gov

Should I Insure My Snowmobile If Not Required?

Even though most of the states in the US don’t require insurance coverage, it doesn’t mean that you won’t be held responsible for any damage you cause. For instance, if you accidentally smash another person’s snowmobile, you will have to pay for the repairs. A situation like this can bring a great loss upon you if you don’t have insurance coverage.

You may ride very carefully, but you can’t always prevent unwanted events from happening. If you have insurance coverage, you can easily obtain financial resources anytime the unexpected things happen.

In essence, snowmobile insurance will protect you from all expenses associated with property damage and injury. So if you haven’t insured your snowmobile yet, it’s high time you insured it.

How Much Insurance Do I Need?

The circumstances that surround your usage should determine the level of insurance you should have. For instance, if you like riding very frequently in rocky areas, a collision and comprehensive coverage would be good for you. If you only ride yours once in a while, a liability coverage might be enough for you.

What Are the Coverage Options I Can Choose?

Here are the snowmobile insurance coverages available in most of the states in the US:

Liability coverage

If you are at fault in an accident, liability coverage will provide financial resources to cover property damage and medical costs for bodily injury. It can cover legal expenses for you if there are some that you must pay.

Collision coverage

This converge centers on your snowmobile. It can give you funds to repair your snowmobile if it gets damaged by impact. This coverage can also give you funds to replace your safety apparels like goggles, and helmet.

Comprehensive

This coverage centers on the snowmobile also. It can give you funds to repair your snowmobile if it gets damaged by weather events, thieves, and animals. This coverage also takes care of custom parts and equipment.

Uninsured motorist

It’s possible for uninsured snowmobilers to hit you. Some might even hit you and run. When a thing like this happens, it means the whole costs of repairs will be on you if you don’t have the uninsured motorist coverage.

Underinsured motorist

At times, you might be in an accident with a snowmobiler who doesn’t have adequate insurance to cover all the costs of an accident. When this happens, this coverage can add some funds to cover the entire costs.

Accessory coverage

This coverage is for accessories like windshield, custom seats, helmets, eyewear, and riding gear. This coverage is ideal for people who have spent much money to get quality accessories for themselves.

How Can I Reduce My Insurance Fee?

Many factors determine the amount you pay for insurance. Fortunately, some of these factors are in your hands. Here are a few things you can do to reduce the amount you pay for insurance.

Ride very carefully

Your riding record will play a role in determining the amount you pay. If your record shows that you haven’t had so many accidents, your fee will reduce a little.

Take a safety course

The insurance agent you walk up to will like to know whether you know how to ride safely. If you have a certificate to prove it, then your fee might reduce.

Lower coverage during the off-season

Since you won’t use the snowmobile often during the off-season, it makes sense to lower your coverage. This will help you save some money. Be careful with this practice though. Ensure you retain any coverage that can protect you from theft and other possible mishaps.

Rob

That's me sinking another ATV. I love to ride no matter what it is, snowmobiles, four wheelers, dirt bikes, and anything else off-roading. I've experienced my fair share of machines, and like to share that experience here.

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